Making a Magazine

April 19, 2019
Andrea Delbanco leads the TFK team
DREW WILIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

A lot goes into making a magazine. Stories are written by writers. They are revised by editors. Words and pictures are arranged on the page by designers. Here’s the inside scoop on how TIME for Kids is made.

DREW WILIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

1. The Morning Meeting

Welcome to TFK’s daily meeting. At our office in New York City, we get together every morning. We gather to talk about what needs to get done. We also talk about what to put in the magazine. Our meetings keep us organized! Sometimes, we have only a day or two to work on a story. Getting things done takes teamwork and communication.

MIKE DECAPITE FOR TIME FOR KIDS

2. Picking Photos

Photos are an important part of a magazine. They help tell the story. Writers, editors, and designers meet to select photos. We look at many photos and choose the best ones.

Here, TFK editorial director Andrea Delbanco and creative director Drew Willis look at photos for a story on moon exploration. How do we decide which photos to use? “The subject of the story must be clear,” says TFK designer Stephen Blue.

DREW WILLIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

3. Writing the Story

First, a writer does research on a story. He or she reads about the topic and talks with experts. Here, TFK’s Rebecca Katzman meets with Jeffrey Kluger, of TIME. Kluger wrote about moon exploration for TIME. Katzman adapted his story for TFK.

Finally, the writer drafts the story. After that, an editor reads it. The editor makes changes and offers suggestions.

DREW WILLIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

4. Designing the Page

A designer works on the story layout. He or she moves photos and text around on a page. There’s a computer program to edit photos. There’s another program to move things around.

See the text on this spread at right? It’s called “dummy text.” It helps the designers know where to put the photos. It also shows the writer how much space he or she will have in which to tell the story.

DREW WILLIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

5. Copyediting

A copy editor is the last person to look at the story. Mike DeCapite (pictured) is one of TFK’s copy editors. He reads through every page of the magazine. He corrects mistakes. He fixes grammar and punctuation. He also rewrites awkward sentences.

“No matter how many people have looked at something, it can always use another look,” DeCapite says. “I miss a lot of things the first time myself.”

DREW WILLIS FOR TIME FOR KIDS

6. The Final Check

TFK’s production team looks over the magazine. They fix photos. They examine page proofs on a light table. They go over each page and make sure everything looks right.

Finally, the magazine is sent off to TFK’s printing plant. It is in Wisconsin. There, millions of copies of the magazine are printed. The copies are put together. Then the magazines are mailed to schools all across the country. Now they’re ready to be read by you and your classmates!