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School Rules

Aven Mullins goes to school in Connecticut. She has a plastic shield around her desk. GILLIAN LAUB FOR TIME

School looks very different this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. Many students went back to school virtually. But some kids returned to a classroom.

Life in the classroom has changed. There are new rules. “We’ll have to wear a mask,” Mia Westerman told TIME for Kids. She is a sixth-grade student in West Virginia. “And we’ll have to social-distance,” she added.

A girl in Florida has her temperature taken outside her school.

PAUL HENNESSY—NURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

No Easy Answer

Kids are less likely to get very sick from the virus. But being indoors and close to other people is risky. Kids can spread the virus to other members of the community.

What is the best way to learn during the pandemic? There is no easy answer. Decisions are being made on a case-by-case basis. Kids are adapting to a lot of change.

GILLIAN LAUB FOR TIME

These changes have not been easy on kids. Remote learning can be lonely. And many students lack access access ETHAMPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES entry; permission to enter or use (noun) Because I have so many legos set up in my bedroom, I have problems getting access to my other toys. to Internet and the devices device ROBERT DALY—COMPASSIONATE EYE FOUNDATION/OJO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES a piece of equipment (noun) Devices, including smartphones and tablets, are banned during tests. they need to learn.

There is a lot of uncertainty in the world right now. But you and your classmates are resilient resilient TONY ANDERSON—GETTY IMAGES able to become strong, healthy, or successful again after something bad happens (adjective) Janay is a resilient athlete, who has recovered from several injuries. . And the importance of learning will never go away.

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