Skip to main content

How Are You Learning?

Hello again, Junior Journalist! School is a big part of your life—and we know it’s an extra-special adventure right now. This week’s assignment is to explore how kids are learning.

Mission 3: How Are You Learning?

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, kids have been learning in all sorts of ways. Many schools went remote but eventually invited students back into classrooms. When the Omicron variant started spreading, some schools switched back to virtual learning while some didn’t. Kids (and adults!) tell us the uncertainty is enough to make their heads spin.

Junior Journalists, we want to know: How are you learning? Have you been at school in person since the start of 2022? Do you, or did you, attend class remotely? What has the experience been like for you? You can also interview your classmates to find out what their experiences have been like. Ask a teacher, parent, or guardian to send us your submission here or at tfkpressclub@time.com.

Click here to learn more about the TFK Press Club and to access other missions.

Line Break

Hear from Junior Journalists

From Henry M. (10, North Carolina) and Chris P. (11, North Carolina): “Masks and social distancing are the new normal now. The masks are very annoying, but they are still here to keep us safe. Being in school is fun, but we miss seeing each other's faces. We usually eat outside. When it is too cold, we eat inside six feet away from each other. Everyone is getting used to wearing masks and all the other COVID protocols.”

From Gabrielle M. (10, Pennsylvania): “School hasn’t been so tough. I’ve been at school ever since the beginning of the 2021–2022 school year. I used to be in online school, and it was bad. I had to clear up space to put a desk in and go to my school every few weeks to get materials. We couldn’t even talk to our friends! Now I have some interesting friends on the bus and a perfect bus driver. The only problem is that me and my neighbors had to wait in the cold. I also have an amazing teacher. To be honest, I’m sad that I have to leave elementary school for middle school, but I’m ready for new adventures!”

From Veer M. (11, India): "Going back to in-person classes, I felt very scared. What if they don’t like me? What if I don’t make friends? What if I spend all my time in the back seat alone? But to my surprise, they were all like me, and we instantly became friends. I was nervous about the teachers as well, but they were kind and welcoming. I was sitting alone until somebody came and sat next to me. I was having fun after a long time. Sure, I had to wear triple-layered masks, but I adjusted to them instantly. I had to be careful and sanitize my hands regularly, but you get used to it.”

From Elanie L. (7, California): ”During the COVID-19 pandemic my learning has changed. When the pandemic first started I was in kindergarten. I went to school every day before the pandemic. But now I have to do school online. Now I am in second grade, but I am still doing school online.

For me, everything stays the same. It feels like being in school every day–doing classes, doing homework, and not having much time to play. But some things are different, too. Now my classroom is at home in my living room. I do not get to play with my friends in person. I can’t go to the library to check out books. I have to read books online or at home.

In first grade, I still had art, music, and PE classes online, but now in second grade I don’t have those classes. Now for art, I draw when I am finished with my homework. For music, I have piano lessons online and I practice every day. For PE, I go outside and play basketball with my parents or my grandpa. On weekends my parents and I hike or ride bikes.”

From Miles P. (9, Massachusetts): “I have gone back to in-person learning. It has been a lot nicer than remote learning, except for lunch because we have to face one way and be silent which is very annoying. I feel more engaged in what we are learning and doing in class. My classmates and I are doing pretty well. I don't mind face masks but some other students have trouble keeping their masks over their noses. Overall, in-person learning has been going pretty well.”

From Aaron B. (10, Massachusetts): “I have gone back to in person learning and I'm happy I can see my friends again! It's been really interesting because we were at our homes for a very long time. It was just so different when the people who run the schools were just like, ‘Okay, now you can go to school again.’ My classmates and I are doing fine, and we can still go on FaceTime and Zoom, especially on the weekends. We do COVID testing every Tuesday. We can still do virtual activities on Zoom, which is pretty awesome. At snack and lunch we are silent and don't sit close to each other. But overall it is still awesome!”

From Molly V. (10, Massachusetts): “My school has gone back to in-person learning. This experience has been okay. I mean, it’s sad that we probably will not go back to normal and that we have to wear masks. But it's for our own safety. During this time I have also been a lot more positive than I used to be. And that has really changed me. Even if this time has been kind of okay for me, I know that there are a lot of other people who are really struggling. I think when grown-ups say to not worry about it, kids get even more worried. So I highly recommend to be honest with people about your feelings. But anyways, in our school, lunch and recess have been a little bit different. You have to be 6 feet apart without your mask on, and we do not eat in the cafeteria like we used to. Well, unless it is a rainy, snowy, or extremely cold day. That's all I really have to say.”

From Simran A. (7, Michigan): "I have been learning in a hybrid setting. I go to school when cases are low and learn virtually during a surge. Here is a COVID doll that I made in my Science of Toys class at school. The doll is double-masked. She is wearing two K95 masks like I do, and she is fully vaccinated."

Junior Journalist submissions have been edited only for length and clarity. They are not intended to reflect the views of TIME for Kids.