TIME for Kids World's Coolest Places 2019

December 6, 2019
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ESCAPE; SADDLEBURN MEDIA; DAVID ROARK; KACEY CHERRY—AFP/GETTY IMAGES; DREW ANGERER—GETTY IMAGES; DE AGOSTINI/GETTY IMAGES; MICHAEL VER SPRILL—GETTY IMAGES; LEGO HOUSE; PAULO AMORIM—NURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

The world is full of amazing places. But which are the coolest for kids? TIME for Kids put together a list of 50 exciting places around the globe. Learn about eight of them here. Which of these cool places would you like to visit?

TRUCHB28—GETTY IMAGES

Louisville Sluggers are baseball bats. They’re made in Kentucky at the LOUISVILLE SLUGGER MUSEUM & FACTORY. It’s a place that celebrates baseball. The Big Bat stands outside. It’s a giant replica of a bat used by Babe Ruth. He was a famous baseball player. Step inside the museum and you’ll see the Big Glove. It’s a work of art you can climb on. There’s also a batting cage where you can practice your swing. And you can pose with real bats used by star players.

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COPENHILL opened in October in Copenhagen, Denmark. It’s a power plant and much more. It makes sustainable living fun. Check out the roof! It has a public park and a recreation center. There, you’ll find one of the world’s tallest climbing walls. Copenhill also has a hiking trail and gardens. Plus, there’s a 1,300-foot artificial ski slope. The slope lets you feel like you’re skiing. But it doesn’t rely on cold weather. Visitors can enjoy the fun year-round.

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The DENALI STAR is a train that chugs through Alaska. It leaves the city of Anchorage every summer morning. After 12 hours, it reaches Fairbanks. It makes three stops. The train passes wetlands, forests, mountains, canyons, and glaciers. Sometimes, passengers can see the peak of Denali. That’s the tallest mountain in North America. For much of the trip, there’s no cell-phone service. Passengers can sit back, unplug, and enjoy the ride.

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Step into ancient caves in the village of WAITOMO. They were first explored more than a century ago. Today, visitors can take a boat inside the caves. Look up! You’ll see sparkling lights. But look a little closer. These aren’t just any lights. They’re glowworms! Glowworms are the larvae of a type of gnat. The insect lives in New Zealand. At this young stage, it can grow as big as a matchstick. The glow comes from its bioluminescent tail.

CITY MUSEUM

CITY MUSEUM is in an old shoe warehouse. A school bus dangles from the roof. A huge jungle gym extends from the windows. Inside, there are dark caves and crashing waters. There are all the ramps, domes, tunnels, chutes, and slides a kid could want. Most of what’s inside City Museum is made of recycled materials. “City Museum is an evolving sculpture,” general manager Rick Erwin says. “It’s like the world’s largest playground.”

OTHERWORLD

OTHERWORLD is an art installation in Columbus, Ohio. More than 40 artists helped create it. It’s full of secret passageways and playgrounds. Kids can fill in coloring books and solve puzzles. They can even crawl into the mouth of a fuzzy monster. “We want young readers to look at the world and think of new and fun ways to use the things they see,” operations director John Umland says.

KACEY CHERRY—AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Humans first landed on the moon in 1969. It was a big accomplishment! Many people helped make it happen. The APOLLO MISSION CONTROL CENTER is where they worked. It’s in Houston, Texas. In 1985, the center was made a National Historic Landmark. Today, you can experience the excitement for yourself. Learn about the engineers, scientists, and flight controllers who made the moon landing a reality. The center hosts events every day of the year.

DAVID NGUYEN

The peanut butter and jelly sandwich is a classic. But PBJ.LA, in Los Angeles, California, gives it a twist. It uses unique nut butters and jams. The sandwiches are served on circular bread. A crimper seals the sandwich and removes the crust. But the crust doesn’t go to waste. It’s used to make cinnamon-and-sugar bites. Many of the ingredients are organic. And they’re made from scratch. “We wanted to take PB&J back to its roots,” says cofounder Payvand Salehi.