Taking a Trip

October 21, 2016
WILL and DENI MCINTYRE—GETTY IMAGES

Do you know anyone who moves south for the winter? Some animals travel south every year. They migrate to winter homes. They go by land, sea, and air. Take a look at animals that migrate.

JHVEPHOTO/GETTY IMAGES

Butterflies fly.

In the fall, monarch butterflies fly south to Mexico. The weather is hotter there. They travel in big groups. They rest in trees.

MICHAEL NOLAN—ROBERT HARDING PHOTO/ALAMY

Gray whales swim.

Gray whales in the Pacific Ocean swim south. They have babies in warmer waters.

WILL AND DENI MCINTYRE—GETTY IMAGES

Antelopes walk.

When it gets cold, antelopes leave the mountains of Wyoming. There is more food for them in the south.

JURGEN FREUND—NATURE PICTURE LIBRARY/ALAMY

Red crabs crawl.

In the fall, millions of red crabs move across an Australian island. They go from the forest to the ocean. Female crabs lay their eggs on beaches.

BILL COSTER—ALAMY

Science Scoop

The Arctic tern makes the longest trip of any bird. It flies more than 44,000 miles each year. It flies from the Arctic, all the way in the north, to Antarctica, in the south. Then it flies back.

Think!

How else do animals get ready for winter?

The Ways to Go

Many animals move south for the winter. The map shows some of the paths they take. Look at the map. Then answer the questions.

ILLUSTRATION BY JEAN WISENBAUGH FOR TIME FOR KIDS

1. In which ocean do gray whales swim?

2. In which country do caribou live?

3. Where do butterflies travel to?

4. In which direction are these animals migrating?